Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

by Littman Bros Lighting

LED Under Cabinet Lights

Under cabinet lighting used to be hardwired toward the back against the back-splash in a kitchen area of the home, the light was then angled forward towards the front of the counter top and also into the kitchen. If you have a close table or seating area to this spot in your kitchen, this under cabinet light would go directly into your eyes; this direct harsh light can be avoided with LED or Xenon strips mounted towards the front of your cabinet with the light directed straight down at your work surface. The lumen output of the LEDs is equivalent to the fluorescent lights but they do not have the same harsh glare – the LEDs seem to appear not as bright as the fluorescent’s because they lack this glare. Place a white object underneath both fluorescent and LED under cabinet lights and you will see that the light output is equivalent and the quality of the LED light may even be a bit warmer and have a truer color spectrum.


Kitchen designs, bathroom designs, and more ∨

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Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

by Littman Bros Lighting

Junction boxes are designed to protect your studs and insulation from your wiring and insulation can go directly against your junction box without creating a fire hazard. Recessed lighting is different; you must have an IC rated fixture to place insulation around the fixture. If you have had your electrical box moved and the old box is still in your ceiling, it must remain accessible from below with a plate cover. Make sure that you don’t drywall over a junction box because that is a wire access point. The correct way to move a light fixture is to pull out the existing junction box and re-route the wires through the new point, then your ceiling can be closed up and your boxes insulated around it.

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

by Littman Bros Lighting

Rooms with fireplaces are often inadequately lit – these spaces are generally designed for relaxing and entertaining but the lighting may only consist of a few lamps. If you’re lucky your builder might have thrown in a few recessed lights near the fireplace for general lighting, that is definitely needed but recessed cans are perfect for lighting the overall space and lack the layers of lighting needed to create depth and highlight the room’s features. When done properly lighting will add depth and ambiance while tying together all aspects of decor.

Fireplace Lighting

Fireplaces are sought after architectural details and should be highlighted in your space – start with placing two recessed lights two feet away to cross-illuminate the fireplace; keeping them close to the fireplace will ensure a person cannot step between the light source and fireplace, creating shadows and blinding an unsuspecting guest. Make sure to get an adjustable trim, either a gimbal or eyeball trim. The two lights should be positioned to wash the area above the mantel. To add some more depth, frame the fireplace with sconces on either side, which will create drama and focus attention on the centerpiece. No room for wall sconces? Or seeking a cleaner look? Accent lighting can be applied above crown molding; this will create a warm inviting glow that will balance the room.

Indirect lighting will help soften the shadows produced by the recessed lights. The exact application of this indirect lighting will depend on your space. A higher ceiling would benefit from one or two pendants or chandeliers centered on the fireplace and a smaller room with a lower ceiling might benefit from just a few lamps. Either application of indirect lighting will soften shadows and add human scale to the space. An accented fireplace will remain the focal point for the room while the layers of light create an inviting space with warmth and interest.